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Graduate Assistantships and Fellowships

Available graduate study opportunities will be posted here as they arise. If the table is empty, please contact the Graduate Coordinator, Dr. Heather McAuslane (gradc@ifas.ufl.edu), as new funding may become available at any time.

OpportunityDescriptionContact

Ph.D. Graduate Research Assistantship Available in 
Insect-Microbiome interactions

Entomology and Nematology Department
Gainesville, Florida
University of Florida
Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS)

 

University of Florida Department of Entomology and Nematomology, IFAS jointed with Genetics Institute.

Fully funded PhD studentship available for Spring 2018 start.

Are you...

  • Interested in microbiome science?
  • Aspiring to tackle real-world problems using insects models in research?
  • Looking to work in a highly collaborative environment enriched with multidisciplinary expertise?

A fully-funded PhD opportunity is available from Spring 2018 in the lab of Dr. Adam CN Wong in the University of Florida Entomology and Nematology Department. The goals of our team are to discover and characterize microorganisms associated with insects, leverage insects (especially Drosophila) as models to study the mechanisms of host-microbe interactions, and to develop novel microbial/genetic based approaches for insect control. The position is ideal for recent Master graduates with a solid molecular biology and genetics background. Bachelor graduates with strong research experience will also be considered. Experience in genomics and bioinformatics is desirable.

For more info, please visit: https://entnemdept.ifas.ufl.edu/people-directory/adam-cn-wong/

To inquire/apply, please email: Dr Adam Wong, adamcnwong@ufl.edu. Applicants shall submit a CV, a 1-page research statement plus 2-3 reference letters.

Graduate Student Assistantship

A new Ph. D. student position is opening at the IFAS/UF North Florida Research and Extension Center in Quincy, FL to work with Dr. Xavier Martini and Dr. Mathews Paret on rose rosette virus and its vector the eriophyid mite Phyllocoptes fructiphilus. 

Florida is the largest producer of roses in the U.S with a value of >$30 million. Rose rosette disease (RRD), that is caused by the Rose rosette virus (RRV), is the most economically important disease of rose production in the U.S. RRD causes foliar mosaic and mottling, flower and leaf malformation, excessive thorniness, increase in lateral shoot formation, young shoot reddening, and plant death.

Florida is the largest producer of roses in the U.S with a value of >$30 million. Rose rosette disease (RRD), that is caused by the Rose rosette virus (RRV), is the most economically important disease of rose production in the U.S. RRD causes foliar mosaic and mottling, flower and leaf malformation, excessive thorniness, increase in lateral shoot formation, young shoot reddening, and plant death.

The graduate student will study the use of systemic acquired resistance inducer in synergy with predatory mites to control the spread of the disease. The student will also investigate plant, vector, and virus interactions as well as the changes in rose physiology due to RRV infection and systemic acquired resistance inducer.

The student will graduate with the Entomology and Nematology Department of the University of Florida. The candidate is expected to start in summer 2018. The position will be located at the North Florida Research and Education Center in Quincy, FL, which is located 2h from the main UF campus in Gainesville and 15 min from the State Capital Tallahassee. The project will be conducted in close collaboration with the University of Georgia (Griffin Station, and main campus in Athens) and Oklahoma State University.

A competitive stipend with a tuition waiver will be provided to the successful applicant.

Required skills: Masters in applied entomology (or related field), preferably with experience and training relevant to IPM. An educational background and/or work experience in plant physiology, horticulture, plant pathology is desirable.

Preferred skills: Experience working with eriophyid mites and/or with molecular technics (DNA extraction and qPCR) is desirable.

Send your application to xmartini@ufl.edu with a curriculum vitae and a letter of intent. In addition, provide contact information of three professional references that could send letter of recommendation to support your application.

Deadline for submitting application is October 13, 2017.

M.S. Graduate Research Assistantship Available Everglades Research and Education Center / Entomology and Nematology Department University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (UF/IFAS)

Sweet corn insect pest management

Position Description: A graduate research assistantship for an M.S. is available in Dr. Julien Beuzelin’s lab at the UF/IFAS Everglades Research and Education Center (EREC) in Belle Glade, FL. The successful applicant will conduct research focusing on sweet corn insect pest management. In addition, the applicant will participate in IPM research and extension efforts for sugarcane, rice, sweet corn, and leafy vegetables in South Florida. The majority of entomology courses are available online, allowing students to reside at the EREC where the research will be conducted. A competitive stipend and tuition waiver for two years is available starting in January 2018.

Background: The state of Florida is the largest producer of sweet corn for the fresh market in the United States. The majority of the sweet corn in Florida is produced in the Everglades Agricultural Area and Miami-Dade County, where picture-winged flies (Diptera: Ulidiidae) are severe ear feeding insect pests. Three species of picture-winged flies, also known as corn silk flies, are problematic: Euxesta stigmatias, Euxesta eluta, and Chaetopsis massyla. Sweet corn is actively scouted for silk flies and insecticides are applied as needed, sometimes as often as daily between silking and harvest. However, there is a need to refine scouting methods and insecticidal management. The successful applicant will focus on research that has two objectives: 1. Develop a streamlined silk fly population monitoring tool by conducting field experiments to identify attractive combinations of selected chemical lures, determine attractive colors and visual patterns, compare the performance of different trap types, and determine the relationship between trap captures in best-performing traps and silk fly field populations. 2. Refine silk fly insecticidal control by conducting field experiments to evaluate the efficacy of baits used with selected insecticides and determine the optimal timing of pyrethroid applications.

Requirements: B.S. degree in biology or a closely related field. Prior experience in agronomic row or vegetable crops, application of agrochemicals, conducting field, greenhouse, and laboratory experiments preferred.

Deadline: The position is open and will remain open until a suitable candidate is selected. However, priority will be given to applications received by September 1, 2017.

Deadline: The position is open and will remain open until a suitable candidate is selected. However, priority will be given to applications received by September 1, 2017.

Application procedure: Applications and inquiries should be e-mailed to Dr. Beuzelin (jbeuzelin@ufl.edu). Applicants should send a short letter of interest, resume, university transcripts, GRE and TOEFL scores (if applicable), and contact information for 2 or 3 professional references.

For more information: Visit the UF/IFAS EREC (http://erec.ifas.ufl.edu/) and Entomology and Nematology Department (http://entnemdept.ufl.edu/) websites. 

Graduate Student Assistantship
Horticultural Entomology

Biological control of Asian citrus psyllid
Diaphorina citri

(graduate student assistantship for PhD)

 

A graduate student assistantship for PhD is available in Dr. Jawwad Qureshi’s entomology lab at the University of Florida Indian River Research and Education Center (IRREC) in Fort Pierce FL. Research work will focus on the role of biological control in the management of Asian citrus psyllid Diaphorina citri in Florida’s landscape. Both basic and applied aspects will be considered involving laboratory and field component. Majority of courses in entomology are available online which provide student with the opportunity to spend more time at the research center where they will be based and conduct research work. Student will be expected to publish both peer reviewed and extension publications therefore fluency in English and writing skills are important. The position is open immediately and will remain open until a suitable candidate is found; however, priority will be given to applications submitted by November 1st, 2017, starting the position in January of 2018.  Interested candidates should send an email describing their past experience and further interests in Ph.D., along with a CV (including MS GPA, GRE scores), college transcripts, and the names and contact information for 2-3 references to Dr. Qureshi (jawwadq@ufl.edu).

Dr. Jawwad Qureshi
Assistant Professor,
Horticultural  Entomology
University of Florida

(772) 577-7339

jawwadq@ufl.edu


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